MDVSA-2014:224: krb5

November 21, 2014 in Mandriva Security Advisories by Security Advisories

Updated krb5 packages fix security vulnerability:

The kadm5_randkey_principal_3 function in lib/kadm5/srv/svr_principal.c
in kadmind in MIT Kerberos 5 (aka krb5) before 1.13 sends old keys
in a response to a -randkey -keepold request, which allows remote
authenticated users to forge tickets by leveraging administrative
access (CVE-2014-5351).

MDVSA-2014:223: wireshark

November 21, 2014 in Mandriva Security Advisories by Security Advisories

Updated wireshark packages fix security vulnerabilities:

SigComp UDVM buffer overflow (CVE-2014-8710).

AMQP crash (CVE-2014-8711).

NCP crashes (CVE-2014-8712, CVE-2014-8713).

TN5250 infinite loops (CVE-2014-8714).

MDVSA-2014:222: libvirt

November 21, 2014 in Mandriva Security Advisories by Security Advisories

Updated libvirt packages fix security vulnerability:

Eric Blake discovered that libvirt incorrectly handled permissions
when processing the qemuDomainFormatXML command. An attacker with
read-only privileges could possibly use this to gain access to certain
information from the domain xml file (CVE-2014-7823).

Convicted ID Thief, Tax Fraudster Now Fugitive

November 21, 2014 in Security News by News Bot

In April 2014, this blog featured a story about Lance Ealy, an Ohio man arrested last year for buying Social Security numbers and banking information from an underground identity theft service that relied in part on data obtained through a company owned by big-three credit bureau Experian. Earlier this week, Ealy was convicted of using the data to fraudulently claim tax refunds with the IRS in the names of more than 175 U.S. citizens, but not before he snipped his monitoring anklet and skipped town.

Lance Ealy, in self-portrait he uploaded to twitter before absconding.

Lance Ealy, in self-portrait he uploaded to twitter before absconding.

On Nov. 18, a jury in Ohio convicted Ealy, 28, on all 46 charges, including aggravated identity theft, and wire and mail fraud. Government prosecutors presented evidence that Ealy had purchased Social Security numbers and financial data on hundreds of consumers, using an identity theft service called Superget.info (later renamed Findget.me). The jury found that Ealy used that information to fraudulently file at least 179 tax refund requests with the Internal Revenue Service, and to open up bank accounts in other victims’ names — accounts he set up to receive and withdraw tens of thousand of dollars in refund payments from the IRS.

The identity theft service that Ealy used was dismantled in 2013, after investigators with the U.S. Secret Service arrested its proprietor and began tracking and finding many of his customers. Investigators later discovered that the service’s owner had obtained much of the consumer data from data brokers by posing as a private investigator based in the United States.

In reality, the owner of Superget.info was a Vietnamese man paying for his accounts at data brokers using cash wire transfers from a bank in Singapore. Among the companies that Ngo signed up with was Court Ventures, a California company that was bought by credit bureau Experian nine months before the government shut down Superget.info.

Court records show that Ealy went to great lengths to delay his trial, and even reached out to this reporter hoping that I would write about his allegations that everyone from his lawyer to the judge in the case was somehow biased against him or unfit to participate in his trial. Early on, Ealy fired his attorney, and opted to represent himself. When the court appointed him a public defender, Ealy again choose to represent himself.

“Mr. Ealy’s motions were in a lot of respects a common delay tactics that defendants use to try to avoid the inevitability of a trial,” said Alex Sistla, an assistant U.S. attorney in Ohio who helped prosecute the case.

Ealy also continued to steal peoples’ identities while he was on trial (although no longer buying from Superget.info), according to the government. His bail was revoked for several months, but in October the judge in the case ordered him released on a surety bond.

It is said that a man who represents himself in court has a fool for a client, and this seems doubly true when facing criminal charges by the U.S. government. Ealy’s trial lasted 11 days, and involved more than 70 witnesses — many of the ID theft victims. His last appearance in court was on Friday. When investigators checked in on Ealy at his home over the weekend, they found his electronic monitoring bracelet but not Ealy.

Ealy faces up to 10 years in prison on each count of possessing 15 or more unauthorized access devices with intent to defraud and using unauthorized access devices to obtain items of $1,000 or more in value; up to five years in prison on each count of filing false claims for income tax refunds with the IRS; up to 20 years in prison on each count of wire fraud and each count of mail fraud; and mandatory two-year sentences on each count of aggravated identity theft that must run consecutive to whatever sentence may ultimately be handed down. Each count of conviction also carries a fine of up to $250,000.

I hope they find Mr. Ealy soon and lock him up for a very long time. Unfortunately, he is one of countless fraudsters perpetrating this costly and disruptive form of identity theft. In 2014, both my sister and I were the victims of tax ID theft, learning that unknown fraudsters had already filed tax refunds in our names when we each filed our taxes with the IRS.

I would advise all U.S. readers to request a tax filing PIN from the IRS (sadly, it turns out that I applied for mine in Feburary, only days after the thieves filed my tax return). If approved, the PIN is required on any tax return filed for that consumer before a return can be accepted. To start the process of applying for a tax return PIN from the IRS, check out the steps at this link. You will almost certainly need to file an IRS form 14039 (PDF), and provide scanned or photocopied records, such a drivers license or passport.

To read more about other ID thieves who were customers of Superget.info that the Secret Service has nabbed and put on trial, check out the stores in this series.

MDVSA-2014:220: qemu

November 21, 2014 in Mandriva Security Advisories by Security Advisories

Updated qemu packages fix security vulnerabilities:

Michael S. Tsirkin discovered that QEMU incorrectly handled vmxnet3
devices. A local guest could possibly use this issue to cause a
denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code on the host
(CVE-2013-4544).

Multiple integer overflow, input validation, logic error, and buffer
overflow flaws were discovered in various QEMU block drivers. An
attacker able to modify a disk image file loaded by a guest could
use these flaws to crash the guest, or corrupt QEMU process memory
on the host, potentially resulting in arbitrary code execution on
the host with the privileges of the QEMU process (CVE-2014-0143,
CVE-2014-0144, CVE-2014-0145, CVE-2014-0147).

A buffer overflow flaw was found in the way the virtio_net_handle_mac()
function of QEMU processed guest requests to update the table of MAC
addresses. A privileged guest user could use this flaw to corrupt
QEMU process memory on the host, potentially resulting in arbitrary
code execution on the host with the privileges of the QEMU process
(CVE-2014-0150).

A divide-by-zero flaw was found in the seek_to_sector() function of
the parallels block driver in QEMU. An attacker able to modify a disk
image file loaded by a guest could use this flaw to crash the guest
(CVE-2014-0142).

A NULL pointer dereference flaw was found in the QCOW2 block driver
in QEMU. An attacker able to modify a disk image file loaded by a
guest could use this flaw to crash the guest (CVE-2014-0146).

It was found that the block driver for Hyper-V VHDX images did not
correctly calculate BAT (Block Allocation Table) entries due to
a missing bounds check. An attacker able to modify a disk image
file loaded by a guest could use this flaw to crash the guest
(CVE-2014-0148).

An out-of-bounds memory access flaw was found in the way QEMU's
IDE device driver handled the execution of SMART EXECUTE OFFLINE
commands. A privileged guest user could use this flaw to corrupt
QEMU process memory on the host, which could potentially result in
arbitrary code execution on the host with the privileges of the QEMU
process (CVE-2014-2894).

Two integer overflow flaws were found in the QEMU block driver for
QCOW version 1 disk images. A user able to alter the QEMU disk image
files loaded by a guest could use either of these flaws to corrupt
QEMU process memory on the host, which could potentially result in
arbitrary code execution on the host with the privileges of the QEMU
process (CVE-2014-0222, CVE-2014-0223).

Multiple buffer overflow, input validation, and out-of-bounds write
flaws were found in the way the virtio, virtio-net, virtio-scsi, and
usb drivers of QEMU handled state loading after migration. A user
able to alter the savevm data (either on the disk or over the wire
during migration) could use either of these flaws to corrupt QEMU
process memory on the (destination) host, which could potentially
result in arbitrary code execution on the host with the privileges
of the QEMU process (CVE-2013-4148, CVE-2013-4151, CVE-2013-4535,
CVE-2013-4536, CVE-2013-4541, CVE-2013-4542, CVE-2013-6399,
CVE-2014-0182, CVE-2014-3461).

An information leak flaw was found in the way QEMU's VGA emulator
accessed frame buffer memory for high resolution displays. A privileged
guest user could use this flaw to leak memory contents of the host to
the guest by setting the display to use a high resolution in the guest
(CVE-2014-3615).

When guest sends udp packet with source port and source addr 0,
uninitialized socket is picked up when looking for matching and already
created udp sockets, and later passed to sosendto() where NULL pointer
dereference is hit during so->slirp->vnetwork_mask.s_addr access Only
guests using qemu user networking are affected (CVE-2014-3640).

The Advanced Threat Research team at Intel Security reported that guest
provided parameter were insufficiently validated in rectangle functions
in the vmware-vga driver. A privileged guest user could use this flaw
to write into qemu address space on the host, potentially escalating
their privileges to those of the qemu host process (CVE-2014-3689).

It was discovered that QEMU incorrectly handled USB xHCI controller
live migration. An attacker could possibly use this issue to cause a
denial of service, or possibly execute arbitrary code (CVE-2014-5263).

James Spadaro of Cisco reported insufficiently sanitized bits_per_pixel
from the client in the QEMU VNC display driver. An attacker having
access to the guest's VNC console could use this flaw to crash the
guest (CVE-2014-7815).

Additionally qemu-1.6+ requires usbredir-0.6+ for USB redirection
support which is also being provided with this advisory.

MDVSA-2014:219: srtp

November 21, 2014 in Mandriva Security Advisories by Security Advisories

Updated srtp package fixes security vulnerability:

Fernando Russ from Groundworks Technologies reported a buffer
overflow flaw in srtp, Cisco's reference implementation
of the Secure Real-time Transport Protocol (SRTP), in how
the crypto_policy_set_from_profile_for_rtp() function applies
cryptographic profiles to an srtp_policy. A remote attacker could
exploit this vulnerability to crash an application linked against
libsrtp, resulting in a denial of service (CVE-2013-2139).