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Security News, Exploits, and Vulnerabilities.

A Day in the Life of a Stolen Healthcare Record

When your credit card gets stolen because a merchant you did business with got hacked, it’s often quite easy for investigators to figure out which company was victimized. The process of divining the provenance of stolen healthcare records, however, is far trickier because these records typically are processed or handled by a gauntlet of third party firms, most of which have no direct relationship with the patient or customer ultimately harmed by the breach.

SendGrid: Employee Account Hacked, Used to Steal Customer Credentials

Sendgrid, an email service used by tens of thousands of companies — including Silicon Valley giants as well as Bitcoin exchange Coinbase — said attackers compromised a Sendgrid employee’s account, which was then used to steal the usernames, email addresses and (hashed) passwords of customer and employee accounts. The announcement comes several weeks after Sendgrid sought to assure customers that the breach was limited to a single customer account.

What’s Your Security Maturity Level?

Not long ago, I was working on a speech and found myself trying to come up with a phrase that encapsulates the difference between organizations that really make cybersecurity a part of their culture and those that merely pay it lip service and do the bare minimum (think ’15 pieces of flair’). When the phrase “security maturity” came to mind, I thought for sure I’d conceived of an original idea and catchy phrase. It turns out this is already a thing. And a really notable thing at that.

How exploit packs are concealed in a Flash object

The main role in performing a hidden attack is played by exploits to software vulnerabilities that can be used to secretly download malicious code on the victim machine. Recently, we have come across a new technique used to hide exploit-based attacks: fraudsters packed the exploit pack in the Flash file.

Taking Down Fraud Sites is Whac-a-Mole

I’ve been doing quite a bit of public speaking lately — usually about cybercrime and underground activity — and there’s one question that nearly always comes from the audience: “Why are these fraud Web sites allowed to operate, and not simply taken down?” This post is intended to serve as the go-to spot for answering […]

POS Providers Feel Brunt of PoSeidon Malware

“PoSeidon,” a new strain of malicious software designed to steal credit and debit card data from hacked point-of-sale (POS) devices, has been implicated in a number of recent breaches involving companies that provide POS services primarily to restaurants, bars and hotels. The shift by the card thieves away from targeting major retailers like Target and Home Depot to attacking countless, smaller users of POS systems is giving financial institutions a run for their money as they struggle to figure out which merchants are responsible for card fraud.

TA15-105A: Simda Botnet

Original release date: April 15, 2015

Systems Affected

Microsoft Windows

Overview

The Simda botnet – a network of computers infected with self-propagating malware – has compromised more than 770,000 computers worldwide [1].

The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in collaboration with Interpol and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), has released this Technical Alert to provide further information about the Simda botnet, along with prevention and mitigation recommendations.

Description

Since 2009, cyber criminals have been targeting computers with unpatched software and compromising them with Simda malware [2]. This malware may re-route a user’s Internet traffic to websites under criminal control or can be used to install additional malware. 

The malicious actors control the network of compromised systems (botnet) through backdoors, giving them remote access to carry out additional attacks or to “sell” control of the botnet to other criminals [1]. The backdoors also morph their presence every few hours, allowing low anti-virus detection rates and the means for stealthy operation [3].    

Impact

A system infected with Simda may allow cyber criminals to harvest user credentials, including banking information; install additional malware; or cause other malicious attacks. The breadth of infected systems allows Simda operators flexibility to load custom features tailored to individual targets.

Solution

Users are recommended to take the following actions to remediate Simda infections:

  • Use and maintain anti-virus software – Anti-virus software recognizes and protects your computer against most known viruses. It is important to keep your anti-virus software up-to-date (see Understanding Anti-Virus Software for more information).
  • Change your passwords – Your original passwords may have been compromised during the infection, so you should change them (see Choosing and Protecting Passwords for more information).
  • Keep your operating system and application software up-to-date – Install software patches so that attackers cannot take advantage of known problems or vulnerabilities. Many operating systems offer automatic updates. If this option is available, you should enable it (see Understanding Patches for more information).
  • Use anti-malware tools – Using a legitimate program that identifies and removes malware can help eliminate an infection. Users can consider employing a remediation tool (examples below) that will help with the removal of Simda from your system.

          Kaspersky Lab : http://www.kaspersky.com/security-scan

          Microsoft: http://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/en-us/default.aspx

          Trend Micro: http://housecall.trendmicro.com/

  • Check to see if your system is infected – The link below offers a simplified check for beginners and a manual check for experts.

          Cyber Defense Institute:  http://www.cyberdefense.jp/simda/

The above are examples only and do not constitute an exhaustive list. The U.S. government does not endorse or support any particular product or vendor.

References

Revision History

  • April 15, 2015: Initial Release

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