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Schroedinger’s Pet(ya)

Earlier today (June 27th), we received reports about a new wave of ransomware attacks spreading around the world, primarily targeting businesses in Ukraine, Russia and Western Europe. If you were one of the unfortunate victims, this screen might look familiar:

Kaspersky Lab solutions successfully stop the attack through the System Watcher component. This technology protects against ransomware attacks by monitoring system changes and rolling back any potentially destructive actions.

At this time, our telemetry indicates more than 2,000 attacks:

Our investigation is ongoing and our findings are far from final at this time. Despite rampant public speculation, the following is what we can confirm from our independent analysis:

How does the ransomware spread?

To capture credentials for spreading, the ransomware uses custom tools, a la Mimikatz. These extract credentials from the lsass.exe process. After extraction, credentials are passed to PsExec tools or WMIC for distribution inside a network.

Other observed infection vectors include:

  • A modified EternalBlue exploit, also used by WannaCry.
  • The EternalRomance exploit – a remote code execution exploit targeting Windows XP to Windows 2008 systems over TCP port 445 (Note: patched with MS17-010).
  • An attack against the update mechanism of a third-party Ukrainian software product called MeDoc.

IMPORTANT: A single infected system on the network possessing administrative credentials is capable of spreading this infection to all the other computers through WMI or PSEXEC.

What does the ransomware do?

The malware waits for 10-60 minutes after the infection to reboot the system. Reboot is scheduled using system facilities with “at” or “schtasks” and “shutdown.exe” tools.

Once it reboots, it starts to encrypt the MFT table in NTFS partitions, overwriting the MBR with a customized loader with a ransom note. More details on the ransom note below.

Network survey

The malware enumerates all network adapters, all known server names via NetBIOS and also retrieves the list of current DHCP leases, if available. Each and every IP on the local network and each server found is checked for open TCP ports 445 and 139. Those machines that have these ports open are then attacked with one of the methods described above.

Password extraction

Resources 1 and 2 of malware binary contain two versions of a standalone tool (32-bit and 64-bit) that tries to extract logins and passwords of logged on users. The tool is run by the main binary. All extracted data is transferred back to the main module via a named pipe with a random GUID-like name.

File Decryption

Are there any hopes of decrypting files for victims already infected? Unfortunately, the ransomware uses a standard, solid encryption scheme so this appears unlikely unless a subtle implementation mistake has been made. The following specifics apply to the encryption mechanism:

  • For all files, one AES-128 key is generated.
  • This AES key is encrypted with threat actors’ public RSA-2048 key.
  • Encrypted AES keys are saved to a README file.
  • Keys are securely generated.

The criminals behind this attack are asking for $300 in Bitcoins to deliver the key that decrypts the ransomed data, payable to a unified Bitcoin account. Unlike Wannacry, this technique would work because the attackers are asking the victims to send their wallet numbers by e-mail to “wowsmith123456@posteo.net”, thus confirming the transactions. We have seen reports this email account has already been shut down, effectively making the full chain decryption for existing victims impossible at this time.

At the time of writing, the Bitcoin wallet has accrued 24 transactions totalling 2.54 BTC or just under $6,000 USD.

Here’s our shortlist of recommendations on how to survive ransomware attacks:

  • Run a robust anti-malware suite with embedded anti-ransomware protection such as System Watcher from Kaspersky Internet Security.
  • Make sure you update Microsoft Windows and all third party software. It’s crucial to apply the MS17-010 bulletin immediately.
  • Do not run open attachments from untrusted sources.
  • Backup sensitive data to external storage and keep it offline.

For sysadmins, our products detect the samples used in the attack by these verdicts:

  • Trojan-Ransom.Win32.PetrWrap.d
  • HEUR:Trojan-Ransom.Win32.PetrWrap.d
  • PDM:Trojan.Win32.Generic
  • UDS: DangerousObject.Multi.Generic
  • Intrusion.Win.MS17-010.e

IOCs

71B6A493388E7D0B40C83CE903BC6B04
0df7179693755b810403a972f4466afb
42b2ff216d14c2c8387c8eabfb1ab7d0
E595c02185d8e12be347915865270cca
e285b6ce047015943e685e6638bd837e

Yara rules


rule ransomware_PetrWrap {
meta:

copyright = "Kaspersky Lab"
description = "Rule to detect PetrWrap ransomware samples"
last_modified = "2017-06-27"
author = "Kaspersky Lab"
hash = "71B6A493388E7D0B40C83CE903BC6B04"
version = "1.0"

strings:

$a1 = "MIIBCgKCAQEAxP/VqKc0yLe9JhVqFMQGwUITO6WpXWnKSNQAYT0O65Cr8PjIQInTeHkXEjfO2n2JmURWV/uHB0ZrlQ/wcYJBwLhQ9EqJ3iDqmN19Oo7NtyEUmbYmopcq+YLIBZzQ2ZTK0A2DtX4GRKxEEFLCy7vP12EYOPXknVy/+mf0JFWixz29QiTf5oLu15wVLONCuEibGaNNpgq+CXsPwfITDbDDmdrRIiUEUw6o3pt5pNOskfOJbMan2TZu" fullword wide
$a2 = ".3ds.7z.accdb.ai.asp.aspx.avhd.back.bak.c.cfg.conf.cpp.cs.ctl.dbf.disk.djvu.doc.docx.dwg.eml.fdb.gz.h.hdd.kdbx.mail.mdb.msg.nrg.ora.ost.ova.ovf.pdf.php.pmf.ppt.pptx.pst.pvi.py.pyc.rar.rtf.sln.sql.tar.vbox.vbs.vcb.vdi.vfd.vmc.vmdk.vmsd.vmx.vsdx.vsv.work.xls" fullword wide
$a3 = "DESTROY ALL OF YOUR DATA! PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOUR POWER CABLE IS PLUGGED" fullword ascii
$a4 = "1Mz7153HMuxXTuR2R1t78mGSdzaAtNbBWX" fullword ascii
$a5 = "wowsmith123456@posteo.net." fullword wide

condition:

uint16(0) == 0x5A4D and
filesize < 1000000 and any of them }

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