Exploit This

Security News, Exploits, and Vulnerabilities.

Fileless attacks against enterprise networks

This threat was originally discovered by a bank’s security team, after detecting Meterpreter code inside the physical memory of a domain controller (DC). Kaspersky Lab participated in the forensic analysis, discovering the use of PowerShell scripts within the Windows registry. Additionally it was discovered that the NETSH utility as used for tunnelling traffic from the victim’s host to the attacker´s C2.

The “EyePyramid” attacks

On January 10, 2017, a court order was declassified by the Italian police, in regards to a chain of cyberattacks directed at top Italian government members and institutions. The attacks leveraged a malware named “EyePyramid” to target a dozen politicians, bankers, prominent freemasons and law enforcement personalities in Italy.

Kaspersky Security Bulletin. Predictions for 2017

Yet another year has flown past and, as far as notable infosec happenings are concerned, this is one for the history books. Drama, intrigue and exploits have plagued 2016 and, as we take stock of some of the more noteworthy stories, we once again cast our gaze forward to glean the shapes of the 2017 threat landscape.

Kaspersky Lab Black Friday Threat Overview 2016

Our research shows that, over the last few years, the holiday period which starts on so-called Black Friday was marked by an increase in phishing and other types of attacks, which suggests that the pattern will be repeated this year.

The Hunt for Lurk

In June, 2016, the Russian police arrested the alleged members of the criminal group known as Lurk. The police suspected Lurk of stealing nearly three billion rubles. The story of Lurk gives some idea of the amount of work that has to be done to obtain enough evidence to arrest and prosecute suspects.

The Tip of the Iceberg: An Unexpected Turn in the xDedic Story

Last week we reported on the xDedic underground marketplace. The day after, an anonymous source posted the links pointed to a series of pastes on the Pastebin, which in turn contained long lists of IP addresses. The author of the comment mentioned that the list of pastes is related to hacked servers from the xDedic marketplace.

xDedic – the shady world of hacked servers for sale

Over the last two years, deep in the slums of the Internet, a different kind of underground market has flourished. The short, cryptic name perhaps doesn’t say much about it: xDedic. However, on this obscure marketplace anyone can purchase more than 70,000 hacked servers from all around the Internet.

ATM infector

In 2009, instead of infecting the computers of users worldwide, criminals went directly after the ATM itself – infecting it with malware called Skimer. Seven years later, our experts discovered a new, improved, version of Skimer.

Freezer Paper around Free Meat

Repackaging Open Source BeEF for Tracking and More

Malware and non-malware ways for ATM jackpotting. Extended cut

Millions of people around the world now use ATMs every day to withdraw cash, pay in to their account or make a variety of payments. Unfortunately, ATM manufacturers and their primary customers – banks – don’t pay much attention to the security of cash machines.

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