Exploit This

Security News, Exploits, and Vulnerabilities.

Roaming Mantis part III: iOS crypto-mining and spreading via malicious content delivery system

In Q2 2018, Kaspersky Lab published two blogposts about Roaming Mantis sharing details of this new cybercriminal campaign. During our research, it became clear that Roaming Mantis has been rather active and has evolved quickly. The group’s malware now supports 27 languages, including multiple countries from Asia and beyond, Europe and the Middle East.

Trojan watch

We continue to research how proliferation of IoT devices affects the daily lives of users and their information security. In our previous study, we touched upon ways of intercepting authentication data using single-board microcomputers. This time, we turned out attention to wearable devices: smartwatches and fitness trackers. Or more precisely, the accelerometers and gyroscopes inside them.

Leaking ads

We found that because of third-party SDKs many popular apps are exposing user data to the internet, with advertising SDKs usually to blame. They collect user data so they can show relevant ads, but often fail to protect that data when sending it to their servers.

Jack of all trades

Among this array of threats we found a rather interesting sample – Trojan.AndroidOS.Loapi. This Trojan boasts a complicated modular architecture that means it can conduct a variety of malicious activities: mine cryptocurrencies, annoy users with constant ads, launch DDoS attacks from the affected device and much more.

Still Stealing

Two years ago we published a blogpost about a popular malware that was being distributed from the Google Play Store. In October and November 2017 we found 85 new malicious apps on Google Play that are stealing credentials for VK.com

Android commercial spyware

There’s certainly no shortage of commercial spying apps for Android, with most positioned as parental control tools. In reality, however, these apps barely differ from spyware, with the exception perhaps of the installation method.

Dangerous liaisons

We took the most popular dating apps and analyzed what sort of user data they were capable of handing over to criminals and under what conditions.

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