Exploit This

Security News, Exploits, and Vulnerabilities.

The return of Mamba ransomware

At the end of 2016, there was a major attack against San Francisco’s Municipal Transportation Agency. The attack was done using Mamba ransomware. This month, we noted that the group behind this ransomware has resumed their attacks against corporations.

A King’s Ransom It is Not

The first half of 2017 began with two intriguing ransomware events, both partly enabled by wormable exploit technology dumped by a group calling themselves “The ShadowBrokers”. These WannaCry and ExPetr ransomware events are the biggest in the sense that they spread the quickest and most effectively of known ransomware to date.

No Free Pass for ExPetr

Recently, there have been discussions around the topic that if our product is installed, ExPetr malware won’t write the special malicious code which encrypts the MFT to MBR. Some have even speculated that some kind of conspiracy might be ongoing.… Read Full Article

In ExPetr/Petya’s shadow, FakeCry ransomware wave hits Ukraine

While the world was still shaking under the destructive ExPetr/Petya attack that hit on June 27, another ransomware attack targeting Ukraine at the same time went almost unnoticed.

ExPetr/Petya/NotPetya is a Wiper, Not Ransomware

After an analysis of the encryption routine of the malware used in the Petya/ExPetr attacks, we have confirmed that the threat actor cannot decrypt victims’ disk, even if a payment was made. This supports the theory that this malware campaign was not designed as a ransomware attack for financial gain. Instead, it appears it was designed as a wiper pretending to be ransomware.

Schroedinger’s Pet(ya)

Earlier today (June 27th), we received reports about a new wave of ransomware attacks spreading around the world, primarily targeting businesses in Ukraine, Russia and Western Europe. Our investigation is ongoing and our findings are far from final at this time. Despite rampant public speculation, the following is what we can confirm from our independent analysis.

KSN Report: Ransomware in 2016-2017

In early 2017, Kaspersky Lab’s researchers have discovered an emerging and dangerous trend: more and more cybercriminals are turning their attention from attacks against private users to targeted ransomware attacks against businesses.

WannaCry mistakes that can help you restore files after infection

Sometimes ransomware developers make mistakes in their code. These mistakes could help victims regain access to their original files after a ransomware infection. This article is a short description of several errors, which were made by the WannaCry ransomware developers.

WannaCry and Lazarus Group – the missing link?

Moments ago, Neel Mehta, a researcher at Google posted a mysterious message on Twitter. The cryptic message in fact refers to similarity between samples that have shared code between themselves. The two samples Neel refers to post are a Wannacry cryptor sample and a Lazarus APT group sample.

WannaCry FAQ: What you need to know today

Friday May 12th marked the start of the dizzying madness that has been ‘WannaCry’, the largest ransomware infection in history. Defenders have been running around trying to understand the malware’s capabilities. In the process, a lot of wires have gotten crossed and we figured it’s time to sit down and set the record straight on what we know, what we wish we knew, and what the near future might hold for us going forward.

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