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Security News, Exploits, and Vulnerabilities.

PetrWrap: the new Petya-based ransomware used in targeted attacks

This year we found a new family of ransomware used in targeted attacks against organizations. After penetrating an organization’s network the threat actors used the PsExec tool to install ransomware on all endpoints and servers in the organization. The next interesting fact about this ransomware is that the threat actors decided to use the well-known Petya ransomware to encrypt user data.

From Shamoon to StoneDrill

Beginning in November 2016, Kaspersky Lab observed a new wave of wiper attacks directed at multiple targets in the Middle East. The malware used in the new attacks was a variant of the infamous Shamoon worm that targeted Saudi Aramco and Rasgas back in 2012.

New(ish) Mirai Spreader Poses New Risks

A cross-platform win32-based Mirai spreader and botnet is in the wild and previously discussed publicly. However, there is much information confused together, as if an entirely new IoT bot is spreading to and from Windows devices. This is not the case. Instead, an accurate assessment is that a previously active Windows botnet is spreading a Mirai bot variant.

Fileless attacks against enterprise networks

This threat was originally discovered by a bank’s security team, after detecting Meterpreter code inside the physical memory of a domain controller (DC). Kaspersky Lab participated in the forensic analysis, discovering the use of PowerShell scripts within the Windows registry. Additionally it was discovered that the NETSH utility as used for tunnelling traffic from the victim’s host to the attacker´s C2.

KopiLuwak: A New JavaScript Payload from Turla

A new, unique JavaScript payload is now being used by Turla in targeted attacks. This new payload, dubbed KopiLuwak, is being delivered using embedded macros within Office documents.

Do web injections exist for Android?

Man-in-the-Browser (MITB) attacks can be implemented using various means, including malicious DLLs, rogue extensions, or more complicated malicious code injected into pages in the browser. We’re often asked if there are any web injection attacks for Android devices. This is our attempt to investigate and give as full an answer as possible.

One-stop-shop: Server steals data then offers it for sale

While intercepting traffic from a number of infected machines that showed signs of Remote Admin Tool malware known as HawkEye, we stumbled upon an interesting domain. It was registered to a command and control server (C2) which held stolen keylog data from HawkEye RAT victims, but was also being used as a one-stop-shop for purchasing hacking goods.

Is Mirai Really as Black as It’s Being Painted?

The Mirai botnet, which is made up of IoT devices and which was involved in DDoS attacks whose scale broke all possible records, causing denial of service across an entire region, has been extensively covered by the mass media. Given that the botnet’s source code has been made publicly available and that the Internet of Things trend is on the rise, no decline in IoT botnet activity should be expected in the near future.

The banker that encrypted files

Many mobile bankers can block a device in order to extort money from its user. But we have discovered a modification of the mobile banking Trojan Trojan-Banker.AndroidOS.Faketoken that went even further – it can encrypt user data. In addition to that, this modification is attacking more than 2,000 financial apps around the world.

Zcash, or the return of malicious miners

On 28 October, the cryptocurrency world saw the emergence of a new player, the Zcash (ZEC) cryptocurrency. Its developers have described it rather figuratively: “If Bitcoin is like HTTP for money, Zcash is HTTPS.” They continue by noting that “unlike Bitcoin, Zcash transactions can be shielded to hide the sender, the recipient and value of all transactions.”

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