Exploit This

Security News, Exploits, and Vulnerabilities.

New trends in the world of IoT threats

Cybercriminals’ interest in IoT devices continues to grow: in H1 2018 we picked up three times as many malware samples attacking smart devices as in the whole of 2017. And in 2017 there were ten times more than in 2016. That doesn’t bode well for the years ahead.

Operation AppleJeus: Lazarus hits cryptocurrency exchange with fake installer and macOS malware

While investigating a cryptocurrency exchange attacked by Lazarus, we made an unexpected discovery. The victim had been infected with the help of a trojanized cryptocurrency trading application, which had been recommended to the company over email.

LuckyMouse hits national data center to organize country-level waterholing campaign

In March 2018 we detected an ongoing campaign targeting a national data center in the Central Asia that we believe has been active since autumn 2017. The choice of target made this campaign especially significant – it meant the attackers gained access to a wide range of government resources at one fell swoop.

The Magala Trojan Clicker: A Hidden Advertising Threat

Magala falls into the category of Trojan Clickers that imitate a user click on a particular webpage, thus boosting advertisement click counts. It’s worth pointing out that Magala doesn’t actually affect the user, other than consuming some of the infected computer’s resources. The main victims are those paying for the advertising.

Dvmap: the first Android malware with code injection

In April 2017 we started observing new rooting malware being distributed through the Google Play Store. Unlike other rooting malware, this Trojan not only installs its modules into the system, it also injects malicious code into the system runtime libraries.

XPan, I am your father

While we have previously written on the now infamous XPan ransomware family, some of it’s variants are still affecting users primarily located in Brazil. This sample is what could be considered as the “father” of other XPan ransomware variants. A considerable amount of indicators within the source code depict the early origins of this sample.

Breaking The Weakest Link Of The Strongest Chain

Around July last year, more than a 100 Israeli servicemen were hit by a cunning threat actor. The attack compromised their devices and exfiltrated data to the attackers’ C&C. In addition, the compromised devices were pushed Trojan updates. The operation remains active at the time of writing this post.

Inside the Gootkit C&C server

In September 2016, we discovered a new version of Gootkit with a characteristic and instantly recognizable feature: an extra check of the environment variable ‘crackme’ in the downloader’s body. Just as interesting was the fact that we were able to gain access to the bot’s C&C server, including its complete hierarchal tree of folders and files and their contents.

Facebook malware – the missing piece

Recently we revealed that a threat actors exploited social networks to spread a Trojan that captures a victim’s entire browser traffic. Approximately 10,000 Facebook users with Windows PCs were hit by malicious friend notifications. In this article we will explain the security issue and attack.

Facebook malware: tag me if you can

A malware attack tricked around 10,000 Facebook users around the world. Compromised PCs were used to hijack Facebook accounts in order to spread the infection through the victim’s Facebook friends and for other malicious activity.

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